September 25, 2018

Digital Signage Market is Anticipated to Grow US$27 Billion by 2024

 

Market Research Engine has published findings that the digital signage market is anticipated to grow $27 Billion by 2024.  Here's a snippet of their overall analysis:

 

How Big is the Global digital signage Market?

The Global digital signage Market is expected to exceed more than US$ 27 billion by 2024 and will grow at a CAGR of more than 6.5% in the given forecast period.

 

The major driving factors of Global digital signage Market are as follows:

 

  • Growth of Commercial Displays Over Consumer Displays in Digital Signage
  • Increasing Need of Reducing the Wastage of Paper and Being Environmentally-Friendly
  • Cost Effectiveness and Assured Return on Investment
  • Rising Demand of OLED-Based Displays
  • Improvements in Technology Offerings and Infrastructure Expansions

The restraining factors of Global digital signage Market are as follows:

 

  • Lack of Standardization
  • Lack of Awareness About Digital Signage

 

September 18, 2018

Will digital signage solve McDonald's woes?


Originally posted  | by Bradley Cooper

 

When you are out on a road trip, is McDonald's your first choice? I only go to McDonald's if it's the only choice available. My main reasons for this mindset are the low quality food, poor service and long wait times.

McDonald's recently tried to turn all this around with a massive digital signage and kiosk upgradeto the tune of $6 billion. The restaurant plans to deliver:

  • Modernized dining rooms featuring "globally and locally inspired décor."
  • Refreshed exteriors.
  • New furniture.
  • Digital self-order kiosks.
  • Remodeled counters centered around new table service.
  • Interior and drive-thru digital menu boards.
  • Designated curbside pick-up spots for mobile pay customers.
  • Expanded McCafé counters with larger display cases.

The real question is whether this upgrade will solve its woes. To understand that, we have to look at what digital signage and interactive kiosks can do and what they can't do.

What they can do

Digital signage can help bring an experience into the 21st century. Customers are used to looking at screens, so deploying screens is just a way to meet their expectations.

However, the most important element in digital signage is how it can improve the customer experience and draw the customer's eye. A bright menu board, for example can be far more pleasing to look at than a static display. The animations can draw customers' attention to a new item on the menu or a discount, which can boost sales.

Kiosks can also deliver more seamless checkout experiences, since customers can order their food directly from the kiosk and receive a ticket for later pickup.

Digital signage is for more than just selling, however. Restaurants can use it to showcase funny videos such as from The Chive, or they can use it with interactive games in the restaurant, such as McDonald's touch tables.

The goal of digital signage is to craft a better experience for the customer so they will come back later and engage with the brand in a deeper manner.

What they can't do

First of all, they can't replace employees. Many people believe that kiosks are a replacement for employees, but they actually boost demand. With kiosks, more customers can order more food, so restaurants like McDonald's need to have more employees in the back end to meet this demand.

Second of all, digital signage and technology in general cannot revitalize a brand by themselves. If the food still tastes bad, no one will care about the fancy displays. Also, if the kiosks don't work well with your other systems, such as mobile payments or a digital coupon, customers will go somewhere else.

For McDonald's in particular to truly succeed, it will need more than just technological upgrades. It will also need an in-depth plan to boost quality and customer satisfaction. The restaurant needs to rethink who it hires, how much it pays them and how they train them.

Training is an area where displays can help. Displays can showcase reminders of how to make a complex product or offer cleanliness tips. But, if managers aren't following through or slacking on training, then it won't stick.

This is why all businesses, not just restaurants, should adopt broader strategies, which integrate the technology into the overall business and customer service strategies.

McDonald's and other restaurants should not look at technology as a separate tool, but as an integrated part of the overall experience, which succeeds or fails based on how well the other elements of the business perform.

 

September 11, 2018

Best Digital Advertising Trends of 2018

Even though television advertisements are a more traditional form of promoting a brand and are not included in the BLR wheelhouse of support, we thought it was important to note these advertising trends of 2018.  The concepts can be bridged into digital content realm:

 

 

How can BLR help you with your digital content?

September 4, 2018

What is A Call To Action?


Marketers will tell you time and time again - that's a great story, but what is the call to action?!  Well, let's talk about it!

Call to Action:

"an instruction to the audience designed to provoke an immediate response, usually using an imperative verb such as "call now", "find out more" or "visit a store today". Other types of calls-to-action might provide consumers with strong reasons for purchasing immediately such an offer that is only available for a limited time" - Wikipedia

 What Now?

 

You've identified your target market.  You've gone digital.  You've made an engaging and interactive display.  But, now you need to ASK for the sale!  A call to action is a reminder to your customers that you want them to take an action.  It may be to sign up for your email campaigns so you can start a drip campaign.  Maybe you want them to pick up an item that is available for a  limited time.

The key to it all...JUST ASK!

August 28, 2018

GET OFF YOUR PHONE


Have you ever been driving down the road and find yourself telling the car next to you (who cannot hear you) to "GET OFF YOUR PHONE?!"  Of course you have! People are always on their phone despite the warnings.  

Norfolk county, near London, is testing a new technology that will flash a warning at drivers who are on their phone.  The technology utilizes a scanner that detects radio signals from a mobile phone that is on a call and then sends the signal to a digital sign down the road.

This type of technology wouldn't be possible without our advances in digital signage along with scanning technologies.  The possibilities for your business are endless!!

August 21, 2018

Visualize The Future With Digital Signage

 

Originally posted on Forbes.com By Jose Avalos

 

Businesses intent on galvanizing customers to patronize physical stores are faced with the challenge of how best to understand their customers, strengthen their brand identity, increase efficiency, boost revenue and reduce costs.

One of the tools for overcoming these challenges is digital signage. Today, smart signs and interactive kiosks offer companies the ability to capture customer data in real-time, and to offer personalized recommendations based on individual preferences.


Digital signage is being used today by advertisers who want to customize messaging to target particular demographic segments. INTEL

A case in point are quick-service restaurants, which are installing self-ordering kiosks to better serve and understand their customers. Fast-food giant Wendy’s, for example, installed more than 1,000 self-ordering kiosks in the U.S. last year, in a move that underscores the growing popularity of this new breed of smart kiosks.

The adoption of innovative technology is expected to lower costs while increasing sales and customer satisfaction. In the case of the fast food industry, interactive kiosks are boosting total sales per transaction. The ability to collect real-time data facilitates everything from targeted marketing and more informed decision-making to better customer experiences and higher profitability.

The Connection Between Advertising And Outcomes

Digital signage is being used today by advertisers who want to customize messaging to target particular demographic segments. Accurate tracking requires, for example, the ability for a sign to distinguish the difference between a 25-year-old woman and a 55-year-old man.

Using facial detection technology and artificial intelligence (AI), different ads can be displayed based on an analysis of who has just walked into a store or stopped in front of a store window. That can mean higher conversions that ultimately boost bottom line.

Data being collected from digital signage is completely anonymous, with the results aggregated for specific demographic groups, but not individualized. But now, some retailers, such as Lolli & Pops, are testing the ability to identify and target individual loyalty program members — who have opted-in — as they walk into a store. Privacy is, of course, an important consideration. Businesses should ensure that their advertising and marketing meets applicable local laws and are respectful of individual customers.

Ultimately, AI-driven analytics will enable advertisers to track whether a customer made a purchase related to a customized ad they saw. Ad attribution, which connects the promotion with the outcome, is the Holy Grail for both retailers and advertising agencies.

The ability to connect the dots between advertising and outcomes is essential for companies investing in kiosks and digital signage. As advertisers gain a better understanding of how digital signs can deliver ROI, it will enable them to best use this technology to personalize customer experiences and increase bottom line.

Investing In Digital Signage

Whether it is digital signage or interactive kiosks, companies that are investing in this technology should ensure that their systems can scale and grow with their needs. It’s important to make sure the technology being implemented can handle future growth, and easily accommodate new capabilities. It also is essential to be able to add new features with software upgrades, rather than having to invest in new hardware.

The Intel Smart Display Module (SDM), for example, offers a scalable media player solution that is optimized for digital signage, kiosks, and point of sale systems. It accommodates a wide range of processors — from the Atom to Core i7 — and can handle whatever workload is required to run smart signs and interactive kiosks. Intel’s innovative visual technologies are making low-power, high performance platforms available for AI-related computing. This facilitates the kind of processing firepower necessary for workload consolidation when managing compute-intensive AI applications.

Visual solutions, such as digital signage and interactive kiosks, enable companies to deliver dynamic content, increase efficiency, and save time and money. Sensors that facilitate the collection of real-time data can now be paired with machine learning systems and IoT connectivity to facilitate data analysis on-the-fly. The result is better targeted advertising, improved customer experiences and, ultimately, positively affecting the bottom line.

To learn more about Intel’s digital signage solutions, visit www.intel.com/digitalsignage.

Jose Avalos heads the leadership and management of Intel’s world-wide retail and digital signage business. He holds an Executive MBA from Harvard Business School, an MSE in Electrical Engineering from Arizona State University, and a BS in Electrical Engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Follow him @Intel_Jose on Twitter.

August 14, 2018

How to measure digital signage ROI

Originally posted on: Digital Signage Today by Debbie Wilson-dewitt
 

Return on Investment (ROI) is a financial term, often calculated using a simple formula: sale profit from an investment minus the cost of that investment, divided by the cost (again), and the ROI is expressed as a percentage. As an example, Michaela buys $2000 of stock in Acme Corp, and later sells that stock for $2600. She takes the $2600 she sold the stock for, subtracts her initial cost of $2000, and gets a net profit of $600. She then divides that $600 by the initial cost of $2000 to get 0.3, which then gets multiplied by 100 to get a percentage of 30 percent for her ROI. Simple enough when it comes to money matters, but what about measuring something a little less tangible, like digital signage ROI?

A digital signage system should be looked at more like marketing than straight costs vs. profits, since the goals aren't necessarily always about money, but about engagement. John Wanamaker, founder of Macy's, famously said, "Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half."

Today, there are formulae for measuring marketing ROI. No matter which formula a company uses, the goal is to get the highest return possible and to increase that ROI percentage over time. One method looks at gross profits vs. marketing budget, another uses Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) in place of gross profits. This seems a little closer to what we might think about when considering digital signage ROI, but still deals with income from sales.

Digital signage is different

Marketing is used to try to influence people to choose your products and services over those of your competitors. Much of retail digital signage is used in this way. But organizational digital signage is different – it's used to inform and entertain internal audiences and visitors, so they engage with the organization, understand its values, and stay updated and motivated to internalize a message or take a desired action.

There are measurable costs to set up and maintain a digital signage system:

  • Hardware (screens, media players, etc.)
  • Software (content management software, design applications)
  • Infrastructure (network, power, cabling)
  • System training
  • Content subscriptions
  • External design services
  • Support and maintenance contracts
  • Labor for consulting, installation, etc.

Then there are the additional operational costs of paying staff to create and schedule content, and generally maintain the digital signage system.

That's all easy enough to add up. But it's very difficult to assign dollar values to the results of general communications that aren't sales-focused. Many of the benefits are intangible (brand loyalty, guest experience, employee morale, etc.), and contribute to other larger business factors (employee retention, guest satisfaction, etc.). So then, what is the "profit" from digital signage?

Instead of Return on Investment (an accounting benchmark), focus on specific goals for individual communications or campaigns by looking at qualitative feedback, behavioral changes and business outcomes. Borrow ideas that come from measuring internal communications, where professionals use SMART objectives, KPIs and other tools. Instead of Return on Investment, a better term for this might be Return on Involvement.

What has value here isn't money, but information. So, to measure digital signage ROI, you need to have information that tells you:

  • If people are engaged
  • If they're having a good experience
  • If they're informed or entertained
  • If they'll continue to use the digital signage system because they feel it's valuable
Objectives determine the task

It is essential that you have a clear idea of what exactly you want your digital signage system to achieve. Is it to improve productivity? Increase event participation? Improve the guest experience? Boost online interactions? Your goal has to be relevant and measurable, and shouldn't be simply to give people information. Your objectives will determine both what you're going to show on digital signs and how you’re going to judge success, so they need to be well-thought-out.

The weird truth is that we care about what we measure, not the other way around. So, make sure you figure out what you want to know before you decide on methodology. It's easy to publish statistics and graphs, but they are ineffectual without analysis that you can use to further your goals. Measure something that is useful and gives clear data, or you may find yourself going down a rabbit hole following unproductive lines of inquiry.

Since a lot of the answers to engagement questions are subjective, a good way to get those answers is quite simply to ask your audience. But there's another powerful tool as your disposal — one that you should already be including in every message, and one that turns each message into its own ROI measurement tool — a clear call to action.

August 7, 2018

Digital Signage In 2018

Technology is ever evolving in the 21st century.  Advances are coming at lightning fast speeds and 2018 is no exception!  In 2017, we saw a huge push for adopting digital signage across many industries.  Now that it the technology has been adopted, 2018 is focused on on-screen personalization, interaction and better customer contact.

Content will become more responsive and automated (who has time for it NOT to be automated?!).  Screens will be able to engage with customers while providing content back to the cloud.  With the in-depth knowledge gained at the screen, companies have an even bigger advantage to get in their customers' heads and gain sales!

"Things are getting more integrated, more comprehensive, faster, smarter, and better looking." - Digital Signage Today

July 31, 2018

The Growing Impact of Digital Signage in Retail


Originally posted by Mark Boidman on June 11, 2018 at  www.digitalsignageconnection.com

Digital signage continues to make a powerful statement in retail as we are starting to see more digital displays, including interactive displays, across retailers throughout the country.

Eight out of 10 customers entered a store for the first time due to a digital sign catching their eye, according to a recent survey.

Moreover, the digital signage hardware and software markets are growing quite quickly. Digital signage revenue in the United States today, in terms of equipment, software, and services plus digital signage media revenue, is about a $20 billion market opportunity using estimates based on publicly available data. This number is likely to rise to just over $25 billion by 2019.

That $20 billion includes about $7 billion of media revenue. Taking the media revenue out of the equation leaves roughly $13 billion for equipment, software and services.

Expanding Reach and Falling Costs

More broadly, digital media on screens in public venues reaches more customers than videos on the Internet. It is a powerful statement of the size and scale of digital billboards and digital screens.

Furthermore, the cost of rolling out a digital signage network continues to fall annually by more than 10 percent, and signage penetration across physical locations increases.

In addition to costs coming down, the number of use cases has increased.

Digital menu boards in physical locations, such as quick-service restaurants or coffee shops, are all being converted to digital screens. Menu boards are becoming digital menu boards. Even buffet table displays or paper tags at café food stations are becoming digital screens.

Cruise ships and hotel buffet displays are well positioned for digital, which are huge market opportunities.

Many coffee shops and retail stores want to roll out massive screens right in the entry of their stores to create experiences and shopping environments in the store that level the playing field with online shopping.

This is why more spectacular displays are being rolled out, especially as technology costs to deploy digital signage and retail tech in general are going down.

Many big cities will one day look just like Times Square.

Changing Customer Behavior

What is starting to happen in most retail stores, especially with young people, is that they are tuning out non-digital screens. They are so used to the digital screen in their pocket, and the ability to interact with those screens, that if they do not find that screen experience in a public store, they may not even walk in or feel comfortable shopping there.

This dynamic is dramatically influencing how shopping malls and stores think and react.

Within retail stores now, whether their products are clothes hanging on the wall or displays of food, there are typically digital screens around or above them. These digital screens showcase products, provide information, provide interactivity and can even take the place of a salesperson to provide supplementary information.

With interactive digital screens, you can determine if retailers have your size, the color you want, and/or make a request to have your choice brought to you.

Contextually Relevant Content to Drive Sales

Digital signage is driving sales and engaging customers, and the more you can engage with somebody at the point of sale and provide them with an improved shopping experience, the more likely you are to see increased brand awareness, as well as growth in sales.

More retail stores are deciding to spend money to roll out networks because it is no longer cost-prohibitive for them to do so. They also realize that networks are critical to create the experiential environment in the store necessary to provide a competitive advantage.

It is imperative to remember that digital signage must deliver more than just content; it must also deliver context.

From a consumer’s first impression at a store entrance through the entire retail experience, digital signage has the ability to turn the person who is merely browsing into your newest customer.

 

 

July 24, 2018

Berkeley Heights, NJ Has New Digital Signage

 


BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NJ - There’s something new and shiny in downtown Berkeley Heights, at the corner of Springfield and Plainfield avenues - a digital sign.

Township Administrator John Bussiculo asked residents to check out the sign during the June 12 council meeting. It was running the sample program, which provided a preview of what residents might see on the sign.

A donation from the Jim Reilly family, in memory of Jim Reilly made this digital sign possible. The sign will be remotely controlled, which means Tom Barton won't need to go out in all kinds of weather to hang the letters on the old sign, said Bussiculo. Now all the messages will be created in a warm office.